Here you can find some interesting data of the Nepalese health system: 

population & life expectancy: in Nepal live around 29.9 million people (Germany: total population 82.2 millions) with 33% which are younger than 14 years. (1) The average life expectancy in Nepal hits 72 years for women and 69 years for men (Germany: life expectancy for male = 77,4 years & for female = 82,6 years). (5)

access to medical aid: it is estimated that in 1999 only 10% of the Nepalese population have access to medical aid. Access to clean
water have 71% of the population and 84% live without sanitary facilities. (3) Since then these rates have improved considerably due to
construction of rural health posts, hospitals, roads etc. Gorkha district has been declared the first district fully equipped with proper
toilets in every household in 2015.

causes of death: leading causes in 1990 were diarrheal diseases (30.300 deaths), pneumonia (20.777) and tuberculosis (14.278).
In 2013 it has changed dramatically and resembles the Western world. The three diseases that took most lives include ischemic
heart disease (20.347), stroke (16.097) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (8.604). (5)

the Nepalese health system: the Asian country Nepal does not have an insurance system. Medical treatment is privately financed. In the World Health Report 2000 of the World Health Organisation (WHO) the country ranks of place 150 in terms of overall goal attainment among the health systems of the 194 member states of the UNO and it ranks of place 186 in terms of fairness in financial distribution (Germany ranks in that list places 14 and 6). In 1999 there were approximately 4.000 doctors, 5.500 nurses and 13.000 health workers registered in Nepal. The total number of hospitals in the entire country hits 83 with 4.124 beds. There is a dramatic concentration of doctors in the Capital region with 60% of the 4.000 doctors in Nepal work in the Kathmandu valley. The vast majority of the remaining 40% works in the bigger cities in the South of the country. Only well below 10% of all doctors work in rural areas and only very few of those work in the mountaineous regions. Most of them are general practitioners. Specialists like surgeons or dentists are not to be found in such remote areas of Nepal. (2)

free eye surgery, funded by a private sponsor                                                moving of a sick person in a mountaineous area

infant mortality: the rate of infant mortality in the year of 2010 totals 43.13 deaths per 1.000 live births. (1)

maternal mortality rate: there are statistically 170 deaths per 100.000 live births in the year of 2010. (1)

physicians desity: there is in average 1 physician per 5.000 inhabitants / 0,21 physicians per 1.000 people in the year of 2004. (1) 

hospital bed density: in the year of 2006 there have been 5 beds per 1.000 inhabitants registered in Nepal. (1)

costs of medical treatment: all costs of medical treatment have to be paid 100% privately. There is no health insurance system established in Nepal. The treatment cost in governmentally run hospitals is discounted. The cost of a scull computed tomography hits around 40 Euros, an abdominal ultrasound costs roughly 5,50 Euros. With an average monthly income from 18 Euros, those costs of medical treatment are unaffordable for most Nepalese.

hospital bed density: in the year of 2006 there have been 5 beds per 1.000 inhabitants registered in Nepal. (1)

basis data about the region of Amppipal: overview medical data of the districts surrounding the Amppipal Hospital. (4)

  district Gorkha district Lamjung district Tanahu Amppipal Hospital
 population 345.000 213.000 381.000
 births 190 117 209 
 hospitals 2 1 1 
 primary health care centres / PHCC 3 2 2 
 patients in PHCC 27.530 10.657 35.586 
 health posts / HP 10 8 12 
 patients in HP 42.889 40.310 62.836 
 sub-HP 55 50 31 
 hospital beds available 16 50 n.a. 46
 in-patients 2.891 4.281 n.a. 1.907
 out-patients 29.882 42.045 n.a. 19.460
 HIV-patients 17 0 6 
 leprosy cases 9 4 13 
 TB cases all 313 161 374 
 pneumonia cases 7.495 4.086 2.417 
 asthma bronchiale cases 4.437 4.667 3.707 
 urinary infections 4.193 2.681 2.650 
 meningitis cases 0 0 6 
 malaria cases 12 1 8 
 cholera cases 0 0 13 
 typhoid fever patients 7.142 3.104 5.745 
 amoebic dysenteritis cases 9.050 5.162 3.823 
 intestinal worms cases 10.8376.653  6.379 
 jaundice cases 911 428 611 

sources:
(1) CIA World Fact Book (online) 2012                                                                                                                                                                                   (2) The World Health Report 2000: Health systems: improving performance. World Health Organization: Geneva, 2000
(3) UNDP: Human Development Report 1999. New York 1999
(4) Nepal Ministry of Health, Department of Health Services: Annual Report 2010/2011
(5) The Lancet 18th Dec 2014

links to further literature & information:
World Health Organization / WHO: www.who.int
The World Bank: www.worldbank.org 
medical books for free: www.fb4d.com